Judges 2: 'Worse Than Willie Horton' There are more than 30,000 state judges in America. And the vast, vast majority of them are not shielded from politics: They have to fight for their seats in elections. Sometimes very contentious elections, funded by millions of dollars in dark money. Is that a good idea? And what does it mean for how justice works in our country?
NPR logo

Judges 2: 'Worse Than Willie Horton'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/747427656/747431185" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Judges 2: 'Worse Than Willie Horton'

Judges 2: 'Worse Than Willie Horton'

Judges 2: 'Worse Than Willie Horton'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/747427656/747431185" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

There are more than 30,000 state judges in America. And the vast, vast majority of them are not shielded from politics: They have to fight for their seats in elections. Sometimes very contentious elections, funded by millions of dollars in dark money. Is that a good idea? And what does it mean for how justice works in our country?

In this Oct. 25, 2010 file photo, demonstrators hold signs during a rally in support of a campaign to remove three state Supreme Court justices who joined in a unanimous ruling legalizing gay marriage in Des Moines, Iowa. Charlie Neibergall/ASSOCIATED PRESS hide caption

toggle caption
Charlie Neibergall/ASSOCIATED PRESS

In this Oct. 25, 2010 file photo, demonstrators hold signs during a rally in support of a campaign to remove three state Supreme Court justices who joined in a unanimous ruling legalizing gay marriage in Des Moines, Iowa.

Charlie Neibergall/ASSOCIATED PRESS