Flying Frenchman Leapfrogs English Channel On His Homemade Hoverboard Franky Zapata made the crossing on his second attempt after after a mishap halfway across sent his first flight plunging into the sea. Zapata says he'll work on a flying car next — after a vacation.
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Flying Frenchman Leapfrogs English Channel On His Homemade Hoverboard

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Flying Frenchman Leapfrogs English Channel On His Homemade Hoverboard

Flying Frenchman Leapfrogs English Channel On His Homemade Hoverboard

Flying Frenchman Leapfrogs English Channel On His Homemade Hoverboard

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Franky Zapata made the crossing on his second attempt after after a mishap halfway across sent his first flight plunging into the sea. Zapata says he'll work on a flying car next — after a vacation.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Good morning. Franky Zapata wasn't giving up. Last month, the French inventor tried to cross the English Channel on a jet-powered hoverboard. But he had a mishap halfway through and fell into the sea. He spent the next several weeks rebuilding his hovercraft. And yesterday, he tried it again. This time, he made it - 20 minutes flying like something from the future from France to the U.K. After he landed across the channel, Zapata said next he's going to work on a flying car. But first he's going to take a vacation.

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