Austrians Turn Up Their Noses At Attempt To Introduce Eau De Commute On Subway The Vienna transit authority tried out piping four pleasing scents through its trains: green tea, grapefruit, sandalwood and melon. Straphangers said they preferred the air au naturale.
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Austrians Turn Up Their Noses At Attempt To Introduce Eau De Commute On Subway

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Austrians Turn Up Their Noses At Attempt To Introduce Eau De Commute On Subway

Austrians Turn Up Their Noses At Attempt To Introduce Eau De Commute On Subway

Austrians Turn Up Their Noses At Attempt To Introduce Eau De Commute On Subway

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/748565561/748565562" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Vienna transit authority tried out piping four pleasing scents through its trains: green tea, grapefruit, sandalwood and melon. Straphangers said they preferred the air au naturale.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Rachel Martin. Commuters in Vienna, Austria, have spoken. They like the way their subway smells. The city's transit authority recently tested out four new lovely scents in the ventilation systems of four trains - green tea, grapefruit, sandalwood and melon. An online poll was held to choose the winning fragrance, and the majority of voters said they preferred a non-perfume commute. I guess, to them, it just didn't make any sense.

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