Snakes On A Plain: Invasive Species And How We Handle Them "You can't make some of these things up that we've seen," biologist Ian Bartoszek told us. "It almost reads out of a sci-fi novel."

We spoke with Bartoszek, Prof. Joel Trexler of Florida International University and Carrie Brown-Lima, director of the New York Invasive Species Research Institute about the threat invasive species present.

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Snakes On A Plain: Invasive Species And How We Handle Them

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Snakes On A Plain: Invasive Species And How We Handle Them

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Snakes On A Plain: Invasive Species And How We Handle Them

Snakes On A Plain: Invasive Species And How We Handle Them

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/749140142/749160523" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Conservancy of Southwest Florida wildlife biologists and female Burmese python removed from egg clutch. CONSERVANCY OF SOUTHWEST FLORIDA hide caption

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CONSERVANCY OF SOUTHWEST FLORIDA

Conservancy of Southwest Florida wildlife biologists and female Burmese python removed from egg clutch.

CONSERVANCY OF SOUTHWEST FLORIDA

Plants that can cause blindness. Beetles that kill trees. Snakes that decimate native animal populations.

Invasive species come in many shapes and sizes, and they represent serious threats to ecosystems across the country.

But from the Florida Everglades to the forests of the northern U.S., people are fighting back, spreading the word about preventing the spread of these species and even trying to eat the problem away.

We spoke with three experts on the subject: Ian Bartoszek, a wildlife biologist with the Conservancy of Southwest Florida, Prof. Joel Trexler of Florida International University and Carrie Brown-Lima, director of the New York Invasive Species Research Institute at Cornell University.