Stare At Seagulls To Save Your Sandwich, Scientists Say Scientists at the University of Exeter say staring at seagulls makes them take longer to attempt to steal food.
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Stare At Seagulls To Save Your Sandwich, Scientists Say

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Stare At Seagulls To Save Your Sandwich, Scientists Say

Stare At Seagulls To Save Your Sandwich, Scientists Say

Stare At Seagulls To Save Your Sandwich, Scientists Say

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/749303297/749303298" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Scientists at the University of Exeter say staring at seagulls makes them take longer to attempt to steal food.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Rachel Martin. Seagulls can be annoying, right? You're out for a fun day at the beach, and they're always getting up in your business, trying to snatch your food. A new study out of Exeter University says the best way to get rid of them is to stare them down. Avert your gaze, and the gulls get greedy. Give them the old death stare, and they take off. Though, the Guardian newspaper points out that you don't want to stare longer than four minutes because according to a different study from 1997, doing so can make you fall in love.

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