Mexican Folk-Fusion Artist Lila Downs On The Soundscape Of Home "I am from Mexico City. Lila Downs is the only singer that I have followed for so many years. Thank you for giving your audience the chance to listen to this amazing artist. Viva Oaxaca," one listener tweeted.

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Mexican Folk-Fusion Artist Lila Downs On The Soundscape Of Home

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Mexican Folk-Fusion Artist Lila Downs On The Soundscape Of Home

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Mexican Folk-Fusion Artist Lila Downs On The Soundscape Of Home

Mexican Folk-Fusion Artist Lila Downs On The Soundscape Of Home

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/750821660/750871994" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Lila Downs. MARCELA TABOADA hide caption

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MARCELA TABOADA

Lila Downs.

MARCELA TABOADA

In some ways, the music of Grammy Award-winning singer/songwriter Lila Downs tells America's immigration story — especially from the past few decades.

She's the daughter of a Scottish-American man who taught at a Minnesota university. Her mother is an indigenous Mexican woman from Oaxaca.

Growing up in Minnesota and Mexico, Downs had to make sense of the very different cultures that made up her world. She did that through music, drawing from all her life experiences: part protest, part celebration.

We spoke with Downs about her newest album, "Al Chile," and the soundscape of home.