The Renegade Anthropologists Who Reinvented How We Think About Race & Gender In his new book, 'Gods of the Upper Air,' Charles King tells the story of Franz Boas, Margaret Mead and the other 20th century anthropologists who challenged outdated notions of race, class and gender.

Also, linguist Geoff Nunberg discusses the language he calls "chatspeak."
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The Renegade Anthropologists Who Reinvented How We Think About Race & Gender

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The Renegade Anthropologists Who Reinvented How We Think About Race & Gender

The Renegade Anthropologists Who Reinvented How We Think About Race & Gender

The Renegade Anthropologists Who Reinvented How We Think About Race & Gender

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/752793139/752843891" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

In his new book, 'Gods of the Upper Air,' Charles King tells the story of Franz Boas, Margaret Mead and the other 20th century anthropologists who challenged outdated notions of race, class and gender.

Also, linguist Geoff Nunberg discusses the language he calls "chatspeak."