Share The Road: How Cities Can Keep Cyclists Safe : 1A "We have to talk about who is empowered on the streets and who is not ... I think this sense of anger from motorists really comes from a place of entitlement," Streetsblog national correspondent Angie Schmitt told us.

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Share The Road: How Cities Can Keep Cyclists Safe

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Share The Road: How Cities Can Keep Cyclists Safe

1A

Share The Road: How Cities Can Keep Cyclists Safe

Share The Road: How Cities Can Keep Cyclists Safe

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/754380729/754472051" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A cyclist rides with morning traffic on the Lower East Side in July 2019 in New York City. As the nation's largest city tries to balance an increasing number of bicyclists along its streets, the numbers of bike riders killed and injured continues to rise. DREW ANGERER/GETTY IMAGES hide caption

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DREW ANGERER/GETTY IMAGES

A cyclist rides with morning traffic on the Lower East Side in July 2019 in New York City. As the nation's largest city tries to balance an increasing number of bicyclists along its streets, the numbers of bike riders killed and injured continues to rise.

DREW ANGERER/GETTY IMAGES

Post World War II America was built for the car. Billions of dollars were poured into the interstate highway system. Cities of the future were built to minimize city living and maximize driving. The car companies made sure of that.

Today, things are different.

More and more people are using their bicycles — and scooters, and electric bicycles, and mopeds — to get around which means suddenly, our roads — and our drivers — are having to make room.

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, bicycling deaths surged by 10 percent last year — even as overall traffic deaths went down.

New York specifically has had so many cycling deaths — 19 so far this year — that Mayor Bill de Blasio has declared it an "epidemic."

How do cyclists share the road while still obeying the law? And how do drivers deal with a changing vehicular landscape?

To answer these questions, we spoke with Angie Schmitt, a national correspondent for Streetsblog, a collective of transportation news sites; Greg Billing, the executive director of the Washington Area Bicyclist Association; and Bruce Deming, an attorney representing injured cyclists and pedestrians. He's also the author of Surviving the Crash: Your Legal Rights in a Bicycle Accident.

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