More Money, More Votes? : Planet Money The 2020 election cycle is almost in full swing. People can barely go a day without seeing an ad from candidates asking for money. But does more money really mean more votes?
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More Money, More Votes?

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More Money, More Votes?

More Money, More Votes?

More Money, More Votes?

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/754518834/754520147" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images
Democratic presidential hopefuls shake hands on stage after the first round of the second Democratic primary debate. (Photo by Brendan Smialowski / AFP)
BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images

Democratic presidential candidates are in full fundraising mode for the 2020 election. Inboxes are being flooded with campaign emails. Social media timelines are swamped with fundraising ads. But candidates aren't necessarily asking for a lot of money. Some are asking for just one dollar.

Today on The Indicator, the amount of money a candidate would have heading into an election used to signal how much support they would get at the polls, but the political game is changing.

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