'20 And Odd. Negroes' In August of 1619, a British ship landed near Jamestown, Virginia with dozens of enslaved Africans — the first black people in the colonies that would be come the United States. Four hundred years later, some African Americans are still looking to Jamestown in search of home and a lost history.
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'20 And Odd. Negroes'

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'20 And Odd. Negroes'

'20 And Odd. Negroes'

'20 And Odd. Negroes'

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/754348666/755248146" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In August of 1619, a British ship landed near Jamestown, Virginia with dozens of enslaved Africans — the first black people in the colonies that would be come the United States. Four hundred years later, some African Americans are still looking to Jamestown in search of home and a lost history.

Engraving shows the arrival of a Dutch slave ship with a group of African slaves for sale, Jamestown, Virginia, 1619. Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Engraving shows the arrival of a Dutch slave ship with a group of African slaves for sale, Jamestown, Virginia, 1619.

Hulton Archive/Getty Images