Want To Adopt Hemingway? Then You Have To Take Waffles Too Hemingway is a farm goose and Waffles is a miniature horse. The unusual pair live at an animal shelter in Bucks County, Pa., where they're up for adoption as a packaged deal.
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Want To Adopt Hemingway? Then You Have To Take Waffles Too

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Want To Adopt Hemingway? Then You Have To Take Waffles Too

Want To Adopt Hemingway? Then You Have To Take Waffles Too

Want To Adopt Hemingway? Then You Have To Take Waffles Too

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/756976605/756976606" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Hemingway is a farm goose and Waffles is a miniature horse. The unusual pair live at an animal shelter in Bucks County, Pa., where they're up for adoption as a packaged deal.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Everybody loves an odd couple - you know, Kirk and Spock, Lucy and Ricky, Richie and the Fonz.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Here's another one for you - Hemingway and Waffles.

INSKEEP: Huh?

MARTIN: Hemingway is a farm goose, and Waffles is a miniature horse, and they are best friends.

INSKEEP: The unusual pair live at an animal shelter in Bucks County, Pa., where they are up for adoption as a package deal. If you adopt Hemingway, you're getting Waffles, and if you want Waffles, got to take Hemingway, too.

VANLY PEARSON: They're just inseparable, which is really odd to see.

MARTIN: That is shelter director Vanly Pearson. She says she has never seen anything quite like this friendship before.

PEARSON: You normally see goats and goats together or horses and horses. But you never see, like, a horse and a goose, I don't think. It sounds like a child book story to me.

MARTIN: Pearson has spent a lot of time with Hemingway and Waffles since the two were rescued from unsafe conditions at a local farm.

PEARSON: They were just living in unsanitary conditions, where, you know, the mud was up to, you know, his knees. And it was just unsanitary - didn't have enough, like, water or anything like that.

INSKEEP: Agh (ph). Well, the hardship seems to have made them friends. Now the horse and goose live together in a single barn stall. Hemingway - that's the goose, remember - has been extra protective of his friend Waffles as the horse recovers from an infection.

PEARSON: When the horse is, you busy, getting his hair trimmed or his hooves done, the goose (laughter) is not happy when we have to take him away for a little bit.

MARTIN: The friends became an overnight sensation after the shelter posted about the unlikely pair online. Pearson says the shelter's fielding dozens of calls from people interested in adopting the animals, despite or maybe because of the unusual catch. But what do Hemingway and Waffles think about their new celebrity status?

(SOUNDBITE OF GOOSE HONKING)

INSKEEP: There you have it - exclusive interview with a goose.

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