Can Global Shipping Go Zero Carbon? A lot of the stuff we buy in the U.S. comes by ship — ships that use a particularly dirty kind of fuel. Now a big shipping company says it wants to go zero carbon. Climate reporter Becky Hersher tells us how some old tech might play a role and where that tech falls short. Follow Maddie on Twitter @maddie_sofia. Email the show at shortwave@npr.org.
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Can Global Shipping Go Zero Carbon?

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Can Global Shipping Go Zero Carbon?

Can Global Shipping Go Zero Carbon?

Can Global Shipping Go Zero Carbon?

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/758045669/777818364" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Container ships and other maritime vessels currently run on pollutant-intensive heavy fuel oil. The world's largest container-shipping company, Maersk, has promised to make its operations zero carbon by 2050. John Greim/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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John Greim/LightRocket via Getty Images

Container ships and other maritime vessels currently run on pollutant-intensive heavy fuel oil. The world's largest container-shipping company, Maersk, has promised to make its operations zero carbon by 2050.

John Greim/LightRocket via Getty Images

A lot of the stuff we buy in the U.S. comes by ship, ships that use a particularly dirty kind of fuel. Now a big shipping company says it wants to go zero carbon. Climate reporter Becky Hersher tells us how some old tech might play a role and where that tech falls short. Follow Maddie on Twitter @maddie_sofia. Email the show at shortwave@npr.org.

This episode was produced by Rebecca Ramirez and edited by Viet Le.