Liberté, Égalité and French Fries What happens when the employees of a French McDonald's take the corporate philosophy so deeply to heart, that it actually becomes a problem for the company?

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Liberté, Égalité and French Fries

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Liberté, Égalité and French Fries

Liberté, Égalité and French Fries

Liberté, Égalité and French Fries

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  • Transcript

Residents of an immigrant neighborhood in northern Marseille gather outside of a McDonald's they are fighting to keep open. Eleanor Beardsley hide caption

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Eleanor Beardsley

Residents of an immigrant neighborhood in northern Marseille gather outside of a McDonald's they are fighting to keep open.

Eleanor Beardsley

Every company has its own corporate culture. Its slogans and values that you're expected to learn and live by as an employee — and then, possibly forget about when you clock out at the end of the day.

But, what happens when the employees of a company take that corporate philosophy so deeply to heart that it actually becomes a problem for the business?

On this episode, we hear from residents of an immigrant neighborhood in Marseille, France who considered their local McDonalds to be a home of sorts, as well as a gateway into French society. So when the owner tries to sell it, they mount a mini-revolution and take extreme measures to try and save it.

To listen to more Rough Translation, check out our previous episodes.