The Science Of Composting Human Remains There aren't that many options for putting your loved ones to rest. There's burial. There's cremation. Now, later this year in Washington state, it'll be legal to compost a human body. Soil scientist Lynne Carpenter-Boggs tells us how the process works and why she describes it as "beautiful." Carpenter-Boggs is also a research advisor at Recompose, a human composting company in Washington. Follow host Maddie Sofia on Twitter @maddie_sofia. Email the show at shortwave@npr.org.
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Compost Your Loved Ones

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Compost Your Loved Ones

Compost Your Loved Ones

Compost Your Loved Ones

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Katrina Spade is the founder and CEO of Recompose. Recompose aims to compost human bodies. Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

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Elaine Thompson/AP

Katrina Spade is the founder and CEO of Recompose. Recompose aims to compost human bodies.

Elaine Thompson/AP

There aren't that many options for putting your loved ones to rest. There's burial. There's cremation. Now, later this year in Washington state, it'll be legal to compost a human body. Soil scientist Lynne Carpenter-Boggs tells us how the process works and why she describes it as "beautiful." Carpenter-Boggs is also a research advisor at Recompose, a human composting company in Washington.

Follow host Maddie Sofia on Twitter @maddie_sofia. Email the show at shortwave@npr.org.

This episode was produced by Rebecca Ramirez and edited by Viet Le.