French Court Rules Rooster May Crow Where It Pleases It all started when Corinne Fesseau built a chicken coop. Neighbors complained her rooster disturbed their sleep. They wanted the bird moved farther away. A judge said no and awarded Fesseau damages.
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French Court Rules Rooster May Crow Where It Pleases

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French Court Rules Rooster May Crow Where It Pleases

French Court Rules Rooster May Crow Where It Pleases

French Court Rules Rooster May Crow Where It Pleases

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It all started when Corinne Fesseau built a chicken coop. Neighbors complained her rooster disturbed their sleep. They wanted the bird moved farther away. A judge said no and awarded Fesseau damages.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Rachel Martin. A French court has ruled that a rooster may crow where it pleases. This all started when Corinne Fesseau built a chicken coop. Her neighbors complained a rooster disturbed their sleep. They wanted the bird moved further away. A judge said no and awarded damages to Fesseau. The rooster, whose name is Maurice, also won over members of the public. One supporter's sign read, the countryside is alive and makes noise, and so do roosters.

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