The Olympic Bounce : Planet Money When new sports are added to the Olympics — like surfing and sports climbing — they see a bump in the year following the games. But, what happens after that?
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The Olympic Bounce

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The Olympic Bounce

The Olympic Bounce

The Olympic Bounce

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LUCAS BARIOULET/AFP/Getty Images
Breakdancing is set to make its debut as an Olympic sport at Paris 2024.
LUCAS BARIOULET/AFP/Getty Images

Some advertisers are worried that the Olympics are losing their luster. Viewership for the winter Olympics has been declining and the summer Olympics has remained pretty flat. In an effort to compete for more eyeballs, official committees are adding new sports like surfing, sports climbing and even breakdancing.

Today on The Indicator why sports that get added to the Olympics roster see a bump in participants.

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