Voters Watch Debate To See Which Candidates Distinguish Themselves Voters react to the Democratic presidential primary debate. They comment on who stood out and who most addressed the issue that is important to them.
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Voters Watch Debate To See Which Candidates Distinguish Themselves

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Voters Watch Debate To See Which Candidates Distinguish Themselves

Voters Watch Debate To See Which Candidates Distinguish Themselves

Voters Watch Debate To See Which Candidates Distinguish Themselves

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/760437028/760437029" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Voters react to the Democratic presidential primary debate. They comment on who stood out and who most addressed the issue that is important to them.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

But what did some voters think last night? Viewers across the country included Noah Taylor (ph) of Virginia, who is 19. He supports Elizabeth Warren, but Julian Castro caught his eye.

NOAH TAYLOR: I really thought that he was able to - be able to kind of extract some of the hard answers from Biden, as well as a few of, like, the other front-runners.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

All right, so as the candidates spent something close to half an hour debating health care last night, 28-year-old Willow Elizabeth Ryder (ph) was watching.

WILLOW ELIZABETH RYDER: The “Medicare for All” issue is probably the most important to me 'cause I'm trans, and I rely on health care in order to be able to afford transition-related care. And my hugest worry with Medicare for All that doesn't have a private option is that the government, which is, you know, about 50% controlled by Republicans, is not going to cover those things.

INSKEEP: Kate Likness (ph), age 33, thought that one subject was missing...

KATE LIKNESS: Getting politics back to serving people instead of serving corporations. And I think overturning Citizens United and getting those obscene amounts of money out of our politics is the only way to do that. People always say they hate politicians, and they hate politics. It's like, no, you don't. You just hate how they're elected.

INSKEEP: The next debate is set for mid-October.

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