The 1A Movie Club Sees 'Hustlers' Siobhan Brooks, an African-American studies professor and former dancer, says the best part of the film was the dressing room scenes. They showed the amount of labor involved, how the women are transforming themselves and what their relationships with one another are like.

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The 1A Movie Club Sees 'Hustlers'

The 1A Movie Club Sees 'Hustlers'

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The stars of "Hustlers." (L-R) Keke Palmer, Cardi B, Jennifer Lopez, Constance Wu and Lili Reinhart pose for a photo. ERIC CHARBONNEAU hide caption

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ERIC CHARBONNEAU

The stars of "Hustlers." (L-R) Keke Palmer, Cardi B, Jennifer Lopez, Constance Wu and Lili Reinhart pose for a photo.

ERIC CHARBONNEAU

The 2008 financial crisis sank Americans into the most serious economic disaster since the Great Depression. Wall Street got greedy, and took us all down with it when it collapsed.

But there's another story about New York in the financial crisis that you might have read in a magazine years ago: about a group of strippers who got a little revenge on Wall Street.

It's the subject of a new film called "Hustlers," which came out on Friday. It's based on a 2015 New York Magazine article.

What does this true story teach us about capitalism, sex work and revenge? And does the film do reality justice?

We spoke to John Horn, the vice president of the 1A Movie Club and host of KPCC's "The Frame"; Beandrea July, a freelance culture writer and film critic; and Siobhan Brooks, a professor of African-American studies at Cal State Fullerton and the author of Unequal Desires: Race and Erotic Capital in the Stripping Industry.

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