One Small Hop On The Magic School Bus, One Giant Leap For STEM Education : 1A The head of content at PBS Kids told us because their programming is free, much of their viewership is comprised of low-income households. This includes children who don't have access to Netflix and other streaming services that offer kids' programming.

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One Small Hop On The Magic School Bus, One Giant Leap For STEM Education

One Small Hop On The Magic School Bus, One Giant Leap For STEM Education

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Formula E Panasonic Jaguar Racing Driver Adam Carroll joins Jaguar Land Rover in bringing Jaguar Primary School Challenge to New York City ahead of the Qualcomm New York City ePrix at The Factory Building in Long Island City, New York. Photo by Craig Barritt/Getty Images for Jaguar Land Rover hide caption

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Photo by Craig Barritt/Getty Images for Jaguar Land Rover

Formula E Panasonic Jaguar Racing Driver Adam Carroll joins Jaguar Land Rover in bringing Jaguar Primary School Challenge to New York City ahead of the Qualcomm New York City ePrix at The Factory Building in Long Island City, New York.

Photo by Craig Barritt/Getty Images for Jaguar Land Rover

In September of 1994, America's children met one of the most iconic animated schoolteachers of all time: Miss Valerie Felicity Frizzle — better known as Miss Frizzle.

It's been 25 years since PBS debuted "The Magic School Bus." The show introduced millions of children to a world where science and their imagination collided inside a very special yellow bus. And Miss Frizzle's cultural impact endures today.

TV has had plenty of science shows: "3-2-1 Contact," "Mr. Wizard's World," "Beekman's World," and "Bill Nye the Science Guy."

But "The Magic School Bus" was different — a book series that was adapted for cartoons, video games and a classroom curriculum.

To learn more about the show's impact on students and STEM education, we spoke with Sandy Welch, program director for the National Science Foundation which helps fund the show's production; Linda Simensky, head of content at PBS Kids; and Evan Spiridellis, founder of JibJab and co-creator of the Netflix series, "Ask the StoryBots."

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