Episode 942: Capitalism In The Courtroom : Planet Money Investors can fund lawsuits for profit, which gives more people access to the courts. But some worry it will warp the justice system. | Subscribe to our weekly newsletter here.
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Episode 942: Capitalism In The Courtroom

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Episode 942: Capitalism In The Courtroom

Episode 942: Capitalism In The Courtroom

Episode 942: Capitalism In The Courtroom

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/766556249/766601038" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
DAMIEN MEYER/AFP/Getty Images
A picture taken on February 8, 2011 in Rennes, western France, shows part of a marble statue representing Themis, the Goddess of Justice at Brittany parliament, headquarters of Rennes appeal court.
DAMIEN MEYER/AFP/Getty Images

Litigation financing allows third-party funders like Burford Capital to invest in other people's lawsuits, but it's long been considered unethical, and is illegal in many places.

But justice can often hinge more on how much money each side has than on what's actually right or wrong. So Burford argues that allowing investments in lawsuits will give more people access to better justice. And it's been a good business for them. But others worry it might warp the justice system.

Music: "Wild Baby Rock" and "Setting It Off"

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