Wanting Wellness: The Booming Business Of Self-Care : 1A The wellness industry can be "incredibly predatory," Dr. Jen Gunter told us.

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Wanting Wellness: The Booming Business Of Self-Care

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Wanting Wellness: The Booming Business Of Self-Care

1A

Wanting Wellness: The Booming Business Of Self-Care

Wanting Wellness: The Booming Business Of Self-Care

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A guest is pampered at the Four Seasons Spa in this undated photo taken in Beverly Hills. FOUR SEASONS HOTEL VIA GETTY IMAGES hide caption

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FOUR SEASONS HOTEL VIA GETTY IMAGES

A guest is pampered at the Four Seasons Spa in this undated photo taken in Beverly Hills.

FOUR SEASONS HOTEL VIA GETTY IMAGES

If you're on YouTube, Instagram or any other social media platform, you may notice a phrase that comes up over and over again — "Self-care Sunday."

"Self-care" and "wellness" come up a lot these days. And no wonder — the "wellness" industry makes a lot of money. More than $4 trillion.

But what even is the "wellness" industry? What does it mean to take care of ourselves? And when a company promises it can help make you a better person, should you believe it?

To answer these questions, we spoke with Amanda Mull, a staff writer for The Atlantic; Elisa Shankle, the cofounder of HealHaus — a wellness space in Brooklyn; and Dr. Jen Gunter, an obstetrician gynecologist and author of The Vagina Bible: The Vulva and the Vagina — Separating the Myth from the Medicine.

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