Episode 943: Unicorn Cowboy : Planet Money The risk-addicted investor who made WeWork possible and changed the way startups work. | Subscribe to our weekly newsletter here.
NPR logo

Episode 943: Unicorn Cowboy

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/767379358/767420896" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Episode 943: Unicorn Cowboy

Episode 943: Unicorn Cowboy

Episode 943: Unicorn Cowboy

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/767379358/767420896" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Falling unicorn. KARL-JOSEF HILDENBRAND/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
KARL-JOSEF HILDENBRAND/AFP/Getty Images

Falling unicorn.

KARL-JOSEF HILDENBRAND/AFP/Getty Images

In just a few years, WeWork raised more than $10 billion dollars and became the most highly valued startup in America. It wouldn't have been possible without Masayoshi Son.

Two years ago, Son launched the Vision Fund, the biggest venture-capital fund in the history of the world. Son, and his Vision Fund, radically changed the way startups work.

Music: "4U", "Who Am I The Greatest" and "African Trap."

Find us: Twitter / Facebook / Instagram

Subscribe to our show on Apple Podcasts, Pocket Casts and NPR One.

For the best business stories on the world wide web, subscribe to our weekly newsletter.