The Science of ASMR And Slime The science is nascent and a little squishy, but researchers like Giulia Poerio are trying to better understand ASMR — a feeling triggered in the brains of some people by whispering, soft tapping, and delicate gestures. She explains how it works, and tells reporter Emily Kwong why slime might be an Internet fad that is, for some, a sensory pleasure-trigger. Follow Maddie on Twitter @maddie_sofia. Email the show at shortwave@npr.org.
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The Squishy Science Behind ASMR

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The Squishy Science Behind ASMR

The Squishy Science Behind ASMR

The Squishy Science Behind ASMR

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'Floam' is a combination of slime and foam. MamiGibbs/Getty Images hide caption

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MamiGibbs/Getty Images

'Floam' is a combination of slime and foam.

MamiGibbs/Getty Images

The science is nascent and a little squishy, but researchers like Giulia Poerio are trying to better understand ASMR — a feeling triggered in the brains of some people by whispering, soft tapping, and delicate gestures. She explains how it works, and tells reporter Emily Kwong why slime — one of the Internet's biggest fads — might be a pleasure-trigger for some, and a trend for others. Read more about Emily's reporting on ASMR on the NPR Shots Blog. Follow Maddie on Twitter @maddie_sofia. Email the show at shortwave@npr.org.

Related NPR Coverage:
"Some People Get 'Brain Tingles' From These Slime Videos. What's Behind The Feeling?" by Emily Kwong

This is episode was produced by Brent Baughman and edited by Viet Le, with help from Emmanuel Johnson and Vanessa Castillo.