Episode 763: BOTUS : Planet Money Two years ago, we built a machine that bought and sold stocks automatically based on President Trump's tweets. | Subscribe to our weekly newsletter here.
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Episode 763: BOTUS

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Episode 763: BOTUS

Episode 763: BOTUS

Episode 763: BOTUS

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/768370374/768699420" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Chelsea Beck/NPR
To understand what goes on inside a stock-picking bot, we at Planet Money built our own.
Chelsea Beck/NPR

Note: This episode originally ran in 2017.

Recently the investment bank JPMorgan Chase launched a new financial metric. They called it the Volfefe Index. The name is a combination of 'volatility' and 'covfefe' — a mysterious word tweeted by the President not too long ago. The purpose of the new index is to track the impact on the market of President Trump's tweets.

Computers have been deciding what stock to buy and to sell for a while now. Two years ago, we built our own machine to buy and sell stocks automatically, by keeping track of the President's Twitter feed. We called it BOTUS, the Bot of the U.S.

On today's show, we're going back to BOTUS, and seeing what might have happened with more modern algorithms.

Music: "Rapture," "Under the Spotlight," "Sneaky Pixels," and "Fancy Robot."

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