The Cost Of Climate Change : Planet Money Climate activists have long used political and social pressures to decrease the use of fossil fuels and preserve forests... but now many are following the money to try and affect change.
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The Cost Of Climate Change

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The Cost Of Climate Change

The Cost Of Climate Change

The Cost Of Climate Change

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images
SAN RAMON, CALIFORNIA - SEPTEMBER 27: Youth climate activists hold signs during a Climate Strike youth protest outside Chevron headquarters on September 27 2019 (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Organizations concerned about climate change know there's one sure way to put pressure on polluting industries: make it harder for them to get the funds they need to operate and grow. That's why climate activist Bill McKibben is trying to convince banks to stop lending money to the fossil fuel industry.

Today on The Indicator, how one man is trying to use the financial industry to save the planet.

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