Of Diet Coke And Nobel Prizes : Planet Money We talk to newly-minted Nobel Prize winner Michael Kremer about using economics to solve real-world problems and what it's like to receive his field's highest honor.
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Of Diet Coke And Nobel Prizes

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Of Diet Coke And Nobel Prizes

Of Diet Coke And Nobel Prizes

Of Diet Coke And Nobel Prizes

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/770455768/770461964" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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JONATHAN NACKSTRAND/AFP via Getty Images
The announcement of the winners of the 2019 Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences. (Photo by Jonathan NACKSTRAND / AFP)
JONATHAN NACKSTRAND/AFP via Getty Images

The field of economics has the reputation of being a little bit abstract—academic, theoretical, and not always grounded in the real world. But this year's Nobel Prize winners are all about applying economic theory to real-world problems and finding real-world solutions.

Today, The Indicator talks to Michael Kremer, a professor at the Department of Economics at Harvard and now one of this year's winners of the Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel. Kremer's work has focused on using economic ideas to improve the lives of real people around the world.

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