The Science Behind Dogs' Love: It's Not Just About Food Clive Wynne, founding director of the Canine Science Collaboratory at Arizona State University, draws on studies from his lab and others around the world to explain what biology, neuroscience, and genetics reveal about dogs and love. His new book is called Dog Is Love: Why and How Your Dog Loves You. Follow host Maddie Sofia on Twitter @maddie_sofia. Email the show at shortwave@npr.org.
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Does Your Dog REALLY Love You?

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Does Your Dog REALLY Love You?

Does Your Dog REALLY Love You?

Does Your Dog REALLY Love You?

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/771847058/783329281" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Eye contact may trigger release of the brain hormone oxytocin in both humans and dogs. Photos by R A Kearton/Getty Images hide caption

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Photos by R A Kearton/Getty Images

Eye contact may trigger release of the brain hormone oxytocin in both humans and dogs.

Photos by R A Kearton/Getty Images

Clive Wynne, founding director of the Canine Science Collaboratory at Arizona State University, draws on studies from his lab and others around the world to explain what biology, neuroscience, and genetics reveal about dogs and love. His new book is called Dog Is Love: Why and How Your Dog Loves You. Follow host Maddie Sofia on Twitter @maddie_sofia. Email the show at shortwave@npr.org.

This episode was produced by Brent Baughman and edited by Viet Le.