Supa Dupa Fly: The History Of Women In Hip-Hop : 1A "Missy's not an artist. She's a movement," music journalist and author Kathy Iandoli told us.

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Supa Dupa Fly: The History Of Women In Hip-Hop

Supa Dupa Fly: The History Of Women In Hip-Hop

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Missy Elliott and Cardi B post together at a party. JARED SISKIN/GETTY IMAGES FOR WARNER MUSIC GROUP hide caption

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JARED SISKIN/GETTY IMAGES FOR WARNER MUSIC GROUP

Missy Elliott and Cardi B post together at a party.

JARED SISKIN/GETTY IMAGES FOR WARNER MUSIC GROUP

Hip-hop has been around for nearly 50 years. It's been written about and studied in colleges, and there's a permanent exhibit dedicated to it at the Smithsonian's National Museum of African American History and Culture.

But as comprehensive as the study of the genre has become, some hip-hop historians have had little to say about women.

We know about Roxanne Shante — there was a Netflix biopic on her released in 2017. '80s legends like Salt-N-Pepa, MC Lyte, and Queen Latifah still perform on stage and at awards shows. But they are just a few of the women who shaped hip-hop's inception.

We spoke with music journalist Kathy Iandoli about her new book, God Save the Queens: The Essential History of Women in Hip-Hop, which tracks women's influence in hip-hop all the way back to 1973.

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