Weekly Wrap: School Surveillance, That Anonymous Book, College Tuition Benefits : It's Been a Minute Senate Republicans have introduced a bill that would expand online and other surveillance of American schoolchildren, in what they call an effort to prevent mass shootings and other violence. But is that type of surveillance effective — and what does it mean for privacy? Plus, news of a book purportedly written by a Trump administration insider, who last year published an anonymous New York Times op-ed about resisting the President's agenda. Service-industry employers such as Chipotle are expanding college tuition benefits to attract workers and reduce turnover. Sam speaks to a Starbucks employee who is close to finishing her degree through that company's program and asks whether most employees can actually take advantage of these benefits. Sam is joined by NPR education correspondent Anya Kamenetz and NPR arts editor Rose Friedman.

Weekly Wrap: School Surveillance, That Anonymous Book, College Tuition Benefits

Weekly Wrap: School Surveillance, That Anonymous Book, College Tuition Benefits

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JEFF PACHOUD/AFP/Getty Images
Students of the Catholic University of Lyon use laptops to take notes in a classroom, on September 18, 2015 in Lyon, eastern France.
JEFF PACHOUD/AFP/Getty Images

Senate Republicans have introduced a bill that would expand school surveillance of students in an effort to stop mass shootings and violence. But is that type of surveillance effective — and what does it mean for students? Plus, news of a book by the same anonymous author of the infamous "I Am Part of The Resistance Inside the Trump Administration" op-ed took the internet by storm this week. Service-industry employers such as Chipotle are expanding college tuition benefits to lessen turnover. Sam speaks to a Starbucks employee who is close to finishing her degree through that company's program and asks whether employees can actually take advantage of these benefits. Sam is joined by NPR education correspondent Anya Kamenetz and NPR arts editor Rose Friedman.

It's Been a Minute is hosted by Sam Sanders and produced by Brent Baughman, Anjuli Sastry and Jason Fuller. Our editors are Kitty Eisele and Alexander McCall. Our director of programming is Steve Nelson. You can follow us on Twitter @NPRItsBeenAMin.