Episode 947: Some-of-the-Money Ball : Planet Money Income pools could change the way baseball players, and maybe the rest of us, think about how we get paid. | Subscribe to our weekly newsletter here.
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Episode 947: Some-of-the-Money Ball

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Episode 947: Some-of-the-Money Ball

Episode 947: Some-of-the-Money Ball

Episode 947: Some-of-the-Money Ball

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/773493342/773552263" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Mark Brown/Getty Images
MIAMI, FL - APRIL 30: Game ball in honor of Ichiro Suzuki #51 of the Miami Marlins 3000th hit for the game between the Miami Marlins and the Pittsburgh Pirates at Marlins Park on April 30, 2017 in Miami, Florida. (Photo by Mark Brown/Getty Images)
Mark Brown/Getty Images

Baseball is a winner-take-all career. There is a very small chance of making massive amounts of money. But more importantly, there is a very big chance of making almost no money. Some minor leaguers earn $8,000 dollars per year.

To have more chances at winning the baseball lottery, some players are deciding to get together and face the odds as a group. They are joining "income pools," which could change the way baseball players, and lots of professionals, think about how we get paid.

Music: "The Grand Old Game" and "Three Up, Three Down."

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