Can Global Shipping Go Zero Carbon? : Planet Money A lot of the stuff we buy comes via ship, using a particularly dirty kind of fuel. Now the shipping industry wants to change.
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Can Global Shipping Go Zero Carbon?

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Can Global Shipping Go Zero Carbon?

Can Global Shipping Go Zero Carbon?

Can Global Shipping Go Zero Carbon?

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/774165708/774169592" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Ji Haixin/VCG /Ji Haixin/VCG via Getty Images
SHANGHAI, CHINA - OCTOBER 04: Tugboats guide a container ship of Maersk Line at the Yangshan Deepwater Port, operated by Shanghai International Port ( Group) Co., Ltd. (SIPG), on October 4, 2019 in Shanghai, China. (Photo by Ji Haixin/VCG via Getty Images)
Ji Haixin/VCG /Ji Haixin/VCG via Getty Images

Today on The Indicator, we present Short Wave, NPR's new daily science podcast hosted by Maddie Sofia. Because science, as with everything else, always comes back to economics!

A lot of the stuff we buy comes via ship, using a particularly dirty kind of fuel. Now a big shipping firm says it wants to go carbon neutral. Short Wave looks at how some old tech might play a role.

Follow Short Wave host Maddie Sofia on Twitter @maddie_sofia. Email the show at shortwave@npr.org.

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