Note: That $1 Million Bill Isn't Real The Lincoln Journal Star reports a man in Nebraska tried to open a bank account with a $1 million bill. Bank tellers told him it wasn't real but he didn't believe them.
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Note: That $1 Million Bill Isn't Real

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Note: That $1 Million Bill Isn't Real

Note: That $1 Million Bill Isn't Real

Note: That $1 Million Bill Isn't Real

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The Lincoln Journal Star reports a man in Nebraska tried to open a bank account with a $1 million bill. Bank tellers told him it wasn't real but he didn't believe them.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. Once upon a time, the largest U.S. bill ever issued for public circulation was the $10,000 bill. Today, if somebody were to give you a bill larger than 100, you should be skeptical. The Lincoln Journal Star reports a man in Nebraska tried to open a checking account with a $1 million bill. Bank tellers told him it wasn't real. He disagreed and left the bank without an account but with his fake currency.

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