The Science Behind Thrill-Seeking It's our first-ever listener questions episode! On this Short Wave, Andy from Grand Rapids, Michigan, asks why some people seek out scary experiences. We reached out to Ken Carter, a psychology professor at Oxford College of Emory University, for answers. Turns out, some of us may be more wired to crave the thrill. Follow Maddie on Twitter @maddie_sofia. Email the show at shortwave@npr.org.
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When A Listener Calls...

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When A Listener Calls...

When A Listener Calls...

When A Listener Calls...

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/775173107/775256332" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Why do some of us enjoy scary experiences? (Not these kids.) RichVintage/Getty Images hide caption

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RichVintage/Getty Images

Why do some of us enjoy scary experiences? (Not these kids.)

RichVintage/Getty Images

It's our first-ever listener questions episode! On this Short Wave, Andy from Grand Rapids, Michigan, asks why some people seek out scary experiences. We reached out to Ken Carter, a psychology professor at Oxford College of Emory University, for answers. Turns out, some of us may be more wired to crave the thrill. Follow Maddie on Twitter @maddie_sofia. Email the show at shortwave@npr.org.

Related Links:

Buzz!: Inside the Minds of Thrill-Seekers, Daredevils, and Adrenaline Junkies, by Kenneth Carter

The Science Of Scary: Why It's So Fun To Be Freaked Out, by Maddie Sofia and Emily Vaughn

This episode was produced by Rebecca Ramirez and edited by Viet Le.