Remembering Former NPR Producer David Rector Former NPR producer David Rector has died.
NPR logo

Remembering Former NPR Producer David Rector

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/777893344/777893345" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Remembering Former NPR Producer David Rector

Remembering Former NPR Producer David Rector

Remembering Former NPR Producer David Rector

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/777893344/777893345" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Former NPR producer David Rector has died.

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

NPR has lost a friend and an old colleague. News reached us this week that David Rector died last month at the age of 69. He'd suffered an aortic dissection years ago that left him a quadriplegic.

David was a calm and kind presence in the chaos of the newsroom, producing stories for All Things Considered and WEEKEND EDITION. He was blessed with a deep, smooth jazz voice and total cut-by-cut recall of almost every movie ever made. He was the local oracle for all questions about popular culture.

After he was disabled, David fought to regain his ability to speak and move. He also succeeded in challenging and overturning a court decision that took away his right to vote, and that helped restore voting rights for many people with legal guardians.

On his last day, David played the Beatles song "The End" for his fiancee Roz Alexander-Kasparik and those gathered around him. The song concludes, and in the end, the love you take is equal to the love you make. David Rector gave the world a lot of love. Our condolences to David's family and all who knew him.

(SOUNDBITE OF THE BEATLES SONG, "THE END")

Copyright © 2019 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.