Tesla CEO Elon Musk Debuts 'Cybertruck' With A Slight Mishap Musk wanted to show off the vehicle's strength. A sledgehammer didn't dent the door. But when a big metal ball was used, the armored window cracked. A second attempt produced the same result.
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Tesla CEO Elon Musk Debuts 'Cybertruck' With A Slight Mishap

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Tesla CEO Elon Musk Debuts 'Cybertruck' With A Slight Mishap

Tesla CEO Elon Musk Debuts 'Cybertruck' With A Slight Mishap

Tesla CEO Elon Musk Debuts 'Cybertruck' With A Slight Mishap

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/781916165/781916166" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Musk wanted to show off the vehicle's strength. A sledgehammer didn't dent the door. But when a big metal ball was used, the armored window cracked. A second attempt produced the same result.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. There was a slight problem when Elon Musk rolled out his latest Tesla electric vehicle, the Cybertruck, at the LA Auto show - looks like a big metal triangle on wheels. The CEO wanted to show off its strength, so a man swung a sledgehammer at the door. It did nothing. Then the car's designer threw a big metal ball at the armored windows, which cracked.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

ELON MUSK: Maybe that was a little too hard.

INSKEEP: So they tried again, and the window cracked again.

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