Indonesian Officials Hope Pets Will Distract Children From Phones Officials in West Java distributed 2,000 pet chicks to elementary and middle schools. Now kids can swap Angry Birds for baby birds, Twitter for tweets!
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Indonesian Officials Hope Pets Will Distract Children From Phones

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Indonesian Officials Hope Pets Will Distract Children From Phones

Indonesian Officials Hope Pets Will Distract Children From Phones

Indonesian Officials Hope Pets Will Distract Children From Phones

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/783223357/783223358" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Officials in West Java distributed 2,000 pet chicks to elementary and middle schools. Now kids can swap Angry Birds for baby birds, Twitter for tweets!

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. If you want kids to spend less time staring at phones, find them something else to do. Officials in West Java, Indonesia, came up with a plan - they distributed 2,000 pet chicks to elementary and middle schools. Now kids can swap Angry Birds for baby birds, Twitter for tweets. Officials hope caring for the pets will instill a sense of responsibility. And if the chicks survive, the kids can post their pictures on Instagram.

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