NPR Listeners Share The Music They're Thankful For In 2019 Following All Things Considered's annual Thanksgiving musical chain of gratitude, we asked listeners what's some of the music they're grateful for this year. Here's what they said.
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NPR Listeners Share The Music They're Thankful For In 2019

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NPR Listeners Share The Music They're Thankful For In 2019

NPR Listeners Share The Music They're Thankful For In 2019

NPR Listeners Share The Music They're Thankful For In 2019

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Following All Things Considered's annual Thanksgiving musical chain of gratitude, we asked listeners what's some of the music they're grateful for this year. Here's what they said.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Yesterday, we asked you to tell us the music you're thankful for this year, and here are some of your answers. Many people told us they're grateful for music that helps them digest the news. Like Daniel Russell, who pointed to Andre Henry's "It Doesn't Have To Be This Way."

DANIEL RUSSEL: For me, oftentimes, I can feel kind of sad about the circumstances that happen, and whenever I listen to that song, it just brings about a great sense of hope.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "IT DOESN'T HAVE TO BE THIS WAY")

ANDRE HENRY: (Singing) It doesn't have to be this way. It doesn't have to be - oh - no, doesn't have to be this way.

SHAPIRO: One artist came up, by far, more than any other - Lizzo.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "JUICE")

LIZZO: (Singing) It ain't my fault that I'm out here getting loose. Got to blame it on the Goose. Got to blame it on my juice, baby.

SHAPIRO: Fifty-one-year old Angela Waites of Birmingham says Lizzo changed her life.

ANGELA WAITES: Well, I have multiple sclerosis, which I've dealt with for 15 years. I have always been just not the most healthy person because I never felt like I needed to, either in my physical life or my emotional relationships. And her music has helped me realize it really doesn't matter if it's important to anybody else; what's important to me is that I take care of myself and I make good decisions for myself and that I live my life as joyfully and happily as she does.

SHAPIRO: And it's back.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "LET IT GO")

IDINA MENZEL: (Singing) Let it go. Let it go. I am one with the wind and sky.

SHAPIRO: Julie Skinner Sutton of Fort Worth told us she is not so grateful for the singing sisters of "Frozen," even as she has relented to taking her kids to see the sequel this weekend.

JULIE SKINNER SUTTON: And we're excited to see the second one. But I know that this means we're going to be riding this tidal wave for several more years, and I thought I'd finally let it go, but I haven't.

SHAPIRO: Well, we're grateful that you shared your playlists with us, both loved and loathed.

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