Founder Of Apostrophe Protection Society Disbands Group John Richards, 96, founded the society 18 years ago to fight the "much abused" punctuation mark. He's ending the group because he says folks these days don't care about using apostrophes correctly.
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Founder Of Apostrophe Protection Society Disbands Group

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Founder Of Apostrophe Protection Society Disbands Group

Founder Of Apostrophe Protection Society Disbands Group

Founder Of Apostrophe Protection Society Disbands Group

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John Richards, 96, founded the society 18 years ago to fight the "much abused" punctuation mark. He's ending the group because he says folks these days don't care about using apostrophes correctly.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene. John Richards founded the Apostrophe Protection Society 18 years ago. He fights for what he calls the much-abused punctuation mark. If you're confused by words like its or your, he's your guy. Sadly, though, at age 96, Richards says he is ending this society. He says folks these days just don't care about using apostrophes correctly. He wrote, the ignorance and laziness present in modern times have won. And that's all.

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