Hudson's Kill : Planet Money Back in the early 1800s, Manhattan was a wild, sparsely populated place, but it was just about to be developed big-time. There was a lot of money to be made knowing what would go where.
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Hudson's Kill

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Hudson's Kill

Hudson's Kill

Hudson's Kill

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Stacey Vanek Smith /NPR
The New York City map of 1811.
Stacey Vanek Smith /NPR

We think of Manhattan as a bustling, crowded city. But back in the early 1800s, it was mostly wild: swamps, meadows, bears, bats. That all started to change with the drawing of a new map - a map that would lay out the economic future of the city. Today on the show, the map that made Manhattan.

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