Kitchen Countertops Tied To Silicosis, Lung Damage, Deaths In Workers It's called silicosis, and it's been known about for decades. So why is it now emerging in new numbers among workers who cut kitchen countertops? NPR science correspondent Nell Greenfieldboyce explains. More of her original reporting on silicosis is here. Follow host Maddie Sofia on Twitter @maddie_sofia. Email the show at shortwave@npr.org.
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The Link Between Kitchen Countertops And A Deadly Disease

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The Link Between Kitchen Countertops And A Deadly Disease

The Link Between Kitchen Countertops And A Deadly Disease

The Link Between Kitchen Countertops And A Deadly Disease

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/784194357/794701443" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Quartz countertops are increasingly popular because they don't chip or stain like marble or granite. John Keeble/Getty Images hide caption

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John Keeble/Getty Images

Quartz countertops are increasingly popular because they don't chip or stain like marble or granite.

John Keeble/Getty Images

It's called silicosis, and it's been known about for decades. So why is it now emerging in new numbers among workers who cut kitchen countertops? NPR science correspondent Nell Greenfieldboyce explains. More of her original reporting on silicosis is here. Follow host Maddie Sofia on Twitter @maddie_sofia. Email the show at shortwave@npr.org.

This episode was produced by Brent Baughman and edited by Viet Le.