2 Lumineers' Members Comment On Their Favorite Albums Of The Decade As part of Morning Edition's Best of the Decade series, in which artists and writers talk about their favorite books, music and movies of the 2010s, we hear from Wesley Schultz and Jeremiah Fraites.
NPR logo

2 Lumineers' Members Comment On Their Favorite Albums Of The Decade

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/784343485/784343486" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
2 Lumineers' Members Comment On Their Favorite Albums Of The Decade

2 Lumineers' Members Comment On Their Favorite Albums Of The Decade

2 Lumineers' Members Comment On Their Favorite Albums Of The Decade

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/784343485/784343486" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

As part of Morning Edition's Best of the Decade series, in which artists and writers talk about their favorite books, music and movies of the 2010s, we hear from Wesley Schultz and Jeremiah Fraites.

NOEL KING, HOST:

We have just under a month left in this decade, so we've been asking artists about their favorite art of the past 10 years. Here are Jeremiah Fraites and Wesley Schultz of The Lumineers talking about their favorite albums of the past decade. And you're going to hear Jeremiah Fraites talk first.

JEREMIAH FRAITES: There's this amazing second album by Bleachers, "Gone Now."

WESLEY SCHULTZ: Yeah, Jack Antonoff - he's amazing.

FRAITES: There's just a bunch of songs in this whole album that is very different. And it was - I thought it was really cool to see him, you know, go from that really big band fun. and then to break away and to see - oh, wow.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "GOODMORNING")

BLEACHERS: (Singing) Woke up, I'm in the in-between, honey. One foot out and I know the weight is coming.

FRAITES: He writes for Taylor Swift and a bunch of other, you know, A-list, Top 40 people. And then this album is equally catchy but in a much - I would say much more nourishing and long-term - like, I could live with the sound for years to come.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "GOODMORNING")

BLEACHERS: (Singing) Because I lied to you. I lied to you. I lied to your face in the summer. You had long hair then. I'm singing out back.

FRAITES: He's not trying to reinvent the wheel. But somehow he is almost reinventing the wheel with these really subtle production moves. A really fascinating album to throw some headphones on, take a walk and listen to.

SCHULTZ: I would say one of my favorite albums is called "Essential Tremors." We toured with this band J. Roddy Walston and The Business.

(SOUNDBITE OF J. RODDY WALSTON AND THE BUSINESS SONG, "BLACK LIGHT")

SCHULTZ: That's been on repeat for me for years now. And he describes his music as if Randy Newman and Led Zeppelin had a baby.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "BLACK LIGHT")

J RODDY WALSTON AND THE BUSINESS: (Singing) White light broke back (ph) the burden of proof. And last night, you told the terminal truth. Oh, who told it to you?

SCHULTZ: I really like that collision of influences. But it's - it's a type of music that you listen to where you think to yourself - how is this guy not a household name right now? And these songs are incredible. And that album, it's - you put it on at a party, and people always quickly ask - what is this?

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "BLACK LIGHT")

J RODDY WALSTON AND THE BUSINESS: (Singing) In the black light - in the black light of our love.

SCHULTZ: It just grabs you. And then you put it on repeat (laughter) - for a long time.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "BLACK LIGHT")

J RODDY WALSTON AND THE BUSINESS: (Singing) Our love - I'm seeing...

KING: That was Wesley Schultz and Jeremiah Fraites from The Lumineers talking about their favorite albums of the decade.

Copyright © 2019 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.