The Reverse Freedom Rides : Code Switch Many people have heard of the Freedom Rides of 1961, when black and white civil rights activists rode buses together to the South to protest segregation. But most people have never heard of what happened the very next summer, when Southern segregationists decided to strike back, using unsuspecting black families as pawns.
NPR logo

The Reverse Freedom Rides

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/786790638/786961021" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
The Reverse Freedom Rides

The Reverse Freedom Rides

The Reverse Freedom Rides

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/786790638/786961021" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Many people have heard of the Freedom Rides of 1961, when black and white civil rights activists rode buses together to the South to protest segregation. But most people have never heard of what happened the very next summer, when Southern segregationists decided to strike back, using unsuspecting black families as pawns.

Lela Mae Williams, 36, and seven of her nine children on arrival in Hyannis, Mass., May 23, 1962. Frank C. Curtin/Associated Press hide caption

toggle caption
Frank C. Curtin/Associated Press

Lela Mae Williams, 36, and seven of her nine children on arrival in Hyannis, Mass., May 23, 1962.

Frank C. Curtin/Associated Press