How Economics Excludes Black Women : Planet Money Economics is an academic field notorious for its lack of diversity. This is especially true for black female economists. Why are they being left out?
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How Economics Excludes Black Women

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How Economics Excludes Black Women

How Economics Excludes Black Women

How Economics Excludes Black Women

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/789555694/789561268" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Sadie Alexander, pictured here, was the first African American to receive a Ph.D. in economics in the U.S. Creative Commons/University of Pennsylvania hide caption

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Creative Commons/University of Pennsylvania

Sadie Alexander, pictured here, was the first African American to receive a Ph.D. in economics in the U.S.

Creative Commons/University of Pennsylvania

In 2017, universities awarded a total of 1,150 economics Ph.D.s. Only 7 of them went to black women. And according to a recent survey of the professional climate, black women in economics were the most likely to face gender or racial discrimination, or both.

On today's show, we speak with Anna Gifty Opoku-Agyeman, a research scholar at Harvard and an aspiring economist, and Lisa Cook, who has been an economist for three decades. They explain the ways that the economics profession excludes black women, and what that means for the quality of economics research and economic policy.

Links referenced in this episode:

Economics Needs More Black Women, By Lisa D. Cook and Anna Gifty Opoku-Agyeman

AEA Professional Climate Survey: Final Report

Sugar and Spice and Everything Nice? Teacher Perceptions of Black Girls in the Classroom, by Dania Francis

Report fo the Committee on the Status of Minority Groups in the Economics Profession, from the AEA

Diversity and Balance in Federal Reserve Leadership, Statement of William E. Spriggs

We've to Build the Pipeline, by Rhonda Sharpe

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