The Birth Of A 'New Negro' : Code Switch Can travel change your identity? It certainly did for one man. Alain Locke, nicknamed the 'Dean of the Harlem Renaissance,' traveled back and forth between Washington, D.C. and Berlin, Germany. In doing so, he was able to completely reimagine what it meant to be black and gay in the 1920s.
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The Birth Of A 'New Negro'

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The Birth Of A 'New Negro'

The Birth Of A 'New Negro'

The Birth Of A 'New Negro'

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/790381948/790766364" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Can travel change your identity? It certainly did for one man. Alain Locke, nicknamed the 'Dean of the Harlem Renaissance,' traveled back and forth between Washington, D.C. and Berlin, Germany. In doing so, he was able to completely reimagine what it meant to be black and gay in the 1920s.

Exterior of the Bauhaus School at Dessau, designed by architect Walter Gropius. General Photographic Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Exterior of the Bauhaus School at Dessau, designed by architect Walter Gropius.

General Photographic Agency/Getty Images