'For Their Own Good': The Detention Of Muslim Ethnic Groups In China "The last time I was able to directly speak with anyone in the country was July 2017," said Salih Hudayar, founder of the East Turkistan National Awakening Movement.

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'For Their Own Good': The Detention Of Muslim Ethnic Groups In China

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'For Their Own Good': The Detention Of Muslim Ethnic Groups In China

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'For Their Own Good': The Detention Of Muslim Ethnic Groups In China

'For Their Own Good': The Detention Of Muslim Ethnic Groups In China

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/790834485/790896965" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Indian Muslims in Mumbai hold placards as they protest to denounce the Chinese government's policies for Uighur Muslims in Xinjiang. Global outrage about the imprisonment of Muslim ethnic groups in China has grown. Y PUNIT PARANJPE/AFP VIA GETTY IMAGE hide caption

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Y PUNIT PARANJPE/AFP VIA GETTY IMAGE

Indian Muslims in Mumbai hold placards as they protest to denounce the Chinese government's policies for Uighur Muslims in Xinjiang. Global outrage about the imprisonment of Muslim ethnic groups in China has grown.

Y PUNIT PARANJPE/AFP VIA GETTY IMAGE

China describes them as "re-education camps:" mass internment facilities in northwestern China that the government says are necessary to counter terrorism and religious extremism.

But over the last three years, the Chinese government has imprisoned about one million Muslim citizens, most of whom are ethnic Uighurs, in these camps.

Xi Jinping's Communist Party says the camps are for "education," but two sets of internal Chinese government documents leaked to the media paint a terrifying picture of incarceration, indoctrination, punishment and even death.

Families of those relegated to these facilities have been kept in the dark about what's happening to their loved ones on the inside.

What have we learned from these leaked documents? And how should the international community confront these atrocities?

To answer these questions, we spoke to Austin Ramzy, a correspondent for The New York Times; Salih Hudayar, the founder of the East Turkistan National Awakening Movement, a non-profit human rights group based in Washington D.C.; and Louisa Greve, the director of global advocacy for the Uyghur Human Rights Project.

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