Shortwave Radio Used For Antarctic Christmas Caroling : Short Wave On Christmas Eve, scientists at field stations across Antarctica sing carols to one another...via shortwave. On today's episode, the Short Wave podcast explores shortwave radio. We speak with space physicist and electrical engineer Nathaniel Frissell about this Antarctic Christmas Carol tradition and his use of shortwave radio for community science.
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A Shortwave Christmas Carol

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A Shortwave Christmas Carol

A Shortwave Christmas Carol

A Shortwave Christmas Carol

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The McMurdo Station is a United States Antarctic Research Center on the south tip of Ross Island. DigitalGlobe/ScapeWare3d/Getty Images hide caption

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DigitalGlobe/ScapeWare3d/Getty Images

The McMurdo Station is a United States Antarctic Research Center on the south tip of Ross Island.

DigitalGlobe/ScapeWare3d/Getty Images

On Christmas Eve, scientists at field stations across Antarctica sing carols to one another...via shortwave. On today's episode, the Short Wave podcast explores shortwave radio. We speak with space physicist and electrical engineer Nathaniel Frissell about this Antarctic Christmas Carol tradition and his use of shortwave radio for community science.

Follow Host Maddie Sofia on Twitter @maddie_sofia and Emily Kwong @emilykwong1234. And email the show at shortwave@npr.org.