How A County Turns Into A Country Prichard, Ala., distributed 10,000 trash cans to residents. The bins are supposed to read "Mobile County," where Prichard is located. Instead they're marked as property of "Mobile Country."
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How A County Turns Into A Country

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How A County Turns Into A Country

How A County Turns Into A Country

How A County Turns Into A Country

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Prichard, Ala., distributed 10,000 trash cans to residents. The bins are supposed to read "Mobile County," where Prichard is located. Instead they're marked as property of "Mobile Country."

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene. City officials in Prichard, Ala., were reminded of the value of proofreading. See, they distributed 10,000 trash cans to residents. The bins are supposed to read Mobile County, where Prichard is located. Instead, they are marked as the property of nonexistent Mobile Country. Rather than chucking the bins, the city's keeping them, stray R and all. Residents say they don't care as long as someone comes to Mobile County to pick up their garbage.

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