Tennessine's Wild Ride To The Periodic Table There are rare chemical elements, and then there is tennessine. Only a couple dozen atoms of the stuff have ever existed. For the 150th anniversary of the periodic table, NPR science correspondent Joe Palca shares the convoluted story of one of the latest elements to be added.

Follow Maddie on Twitter @maddie_sofia. Email the team at shortwave@npr.org.
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Tennessine's Wild Ride To The Periodic Table

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Tennessine's Wild Ride To The Periodic Table

Tennessine's Wild Ride To The Periodic Table

Tennessine's Wild Ride To The Periodic Table

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The discovery of several of the heaviest elements, including tennessine, was confirmed at the Joint Institute For Nuclear Research in Dubna, Russia. SVF2/Universal Images Group via Getty hide caption

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SVF2/Universal Images Group via Getty

The discovery of several of the heaviest elements, including tennessine, was confirmed at the Joint Institute For Nuclear Research in Dubna, Russia.

SVF2/Universal Images Group via Getty

There are rare chemical elements, and then there is tennessine. Only a couple dozen atoms of the stuff have ever existed. For the 150th anniversary of the periodic table, NPR science correspondent Joe Palca shares the convoluted story of one of the latest elements to be added.

Follow Maddie on Twitter @maddie_sofia. Email the team at shortwave@npr.org.

This episode was produced by Brit Hanson, edited by Andrea Kissack, and fact checked by Emily Vaughn.