How Chief Justice Roberts May Preside Over Senate Impeachment House Speaker Nancy Pelosi is expected to hand over articles of impeachment to the Senate next week and when the trial begins, Chief Justice John Roberts will be in the center chair. But how much power will he have? If past is prologue, the answer might be... not much. Plus, what Bill Clinton's impeachment might tell us about what to expect from the Senate trial. This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, legal affairs correspondent Nina Totenberg, and senior editor and correspondent Ron Elving.
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How Chief Justice Roberts May Preside Over Senate Impeachment

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How Chief Justice Roberts May Preside Over Senate Impeachment

How Chief Justice Roberts May Preside Over Senate Impeachment

How Chief Justice Roberts May Preside Over Senate Impeachment

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/795368621/795391496" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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House Speaker Nancy Pelosi is expected to hand over articles of impeachment to the Senate next week and when the trial begins, Chief Justice John Roberts will be in the center chair. But how much power will he have? If past is prologue, the answer might be... not much. Plus, what Bill Clinton's impeachment might tell us about what to expect from the Senate trial. This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, legal affairs correspondent Nina Totenberg, and senior editor and correspondent Ron Elving.