The Murderous Coup of 1898 & The Rise of White Supremacy In the 1890s, Wilmington, N.C. was a mixed-race community with a thriving black middle class, black aldermen and police officers, and a black newspaper. White supremacists saw this as an abomination, and plotted a bloody purge around the 1898 election. They rampaged through the streets, killing 60 black men, and banished prominent black people and their white allies from the city. Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist David Zucchino tells the story in his new book, 'Wilmington's Lie.'

Also, jazz critic Kevin Whitehead reviews, 'Ow!,' a newly resurfaced live recording of saxophonists Eddie "Lockjaw" Davis and Johnny Griffin.
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The Murderous Coup of 1898 & The Rise of White Supremacy

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The Murderous Coup of 1898 & The Rise of White Supremacy

The Murderous Coup of 1898 & The Rise of White Supremacy

The Murderous Coup of 1898 & The Rise of White Supremacy

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/795906807/795955819" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

In the 1890s, Wilmington, N.C. was a mixed-race community with a thriving black middle class, black aldermen and police officers, and a black newspaper. White supremacists saw this as an abomination, and plotted a bloody purge around the 1898 election. They rampaged through the streets, killing 60 black men, and banished prominent black people and their white allies from the city. Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist David Zucchino tells the story in his new book, 'Wilmington's Lie.'

Also, jazz critic Kevin Whitehead reviews, 'Ow!,' a newly resurfaced live recording of saxophonists Eddie "Lockjaw" Davis and Johnny Griffin.